Hawai‘i College of Oriental Medicine

Formerly Named "Traditional Chinese Medical College of Hawaii"

Medical News & Research


  • 10 Sep 2012 10:49 PM | Greg Baker (Administrator)

    Study: Placebo or not, acupuncture helps with pain (USATODAY NEWS)

    Acupuncture gets a thumbs-up for helping relieve pain from chronic headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review of more than two dozen studies -- the latest analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as many fans as critics...

    click link to see article:

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/story/2012/09/10/study-placebo-or-not-acupuncture-helps-with-pain/57735412/1

  • 01 Sep 2012 7:34 AM | Greg Baker (Administrator)

    Electro-acupuncture on functional peripheral nerve regeneration in mice: a behavioural study


    Abstract

    Background

    The improvement of axonal regeneration is a major objective in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of electro-acupuncture on the functional recovery of sensorimotor responses following left sciatic nerve crush in mice.

    Methods

    Sciatic nerve crush was performed on seven week old female mice. Following the injury, the control group was untreated while the experimental group received an electro-acupuncture application to the injured limb under isoflurane anesthesia at acupoints GB 30 and GB 34.

    Mechanical and heat sensitivity tests were performed to evaluate sensory recovery. Gait analysis was performed to assess sensorimotor recovery.

    Results

    Our results show that normal sensory recovery is achieved within five to six weeks with a two-week period of pain preceding the recovery to normal sensitivity levels. While electroacupuncture did not accelerate sensory recovery, it did alleviate pain-related behaviour but only when applied during this period. Application before the development of painful symptoms did not prevent their occurrence. 

    The analysis of gait in relation to the sensory tests suggests that the electro-acupuncture specifically improved motor recovery.

    Conclusions

    This study demonstrates that electro-acupuncture exerts a positive influence on motor recovery and is efficient in the treatment of pain symptoms that develop during target reinnervation.


    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2012, 12:141 doi:10.1186/1472-6882-12-141

    ISSN 1472-6882
    Article type Research article
    Submission date 28 March 2012
    Acceptance date 8 July 2012
    Publication date 31 August 2012
    Article URL http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/12/141




  • 15 Feb 2012 10:05 AM | Greg Baker (Administrator)
    (Learn top 20 characteristics of the most successful acupuncture clinics)

    What Does It Take to Succeed in an Acupuncture Practice?

    By John Amaro, LAc, DC, Dipl. Ac.(NCCAOM), Dipl.Med.Ac.(IAMA)

    In a clinical practice, business success usually is measured by increased income, increased numbers of patients seen per day and lower operating expenses. By comparison, practice success may be measured by factors such as high percentage of favorable clinical results, high patient satisfaction, high referral levels, and personal satisfaction with regard to hours spent in the practice vs. time allowed for family, travel and self. The combination of business and practice success creates what is known as personal success, which may be defined by the material things of life: nice homes, autos, clothes, and a never-ending shopping cart of luxuries....

    SEE FULL ARTICLE HERE

  • 09 Feb 2012 6:30 PM | Greg Baker (Administrator)

    Massage Is Promising for Muscle Recovery: Researchers Find 10 Minutes Reduces Inflammation

    ScienceDaily (Feb. 1, 2012) undefined Researchers at McMaster University have discovered a brief 10-minute massage helps reduce inflammation in muscle.

    As a non-drug therapy, massage holds the potential to help not just bone-weary athletes but those with inflammation-related chronic conditions, such as arthritis or muscular dystrophy, says Justin Crane, a doctoral student in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster.

    While massage is well accepted as a therapy for relieving muscle tension and pain, the researchers delved deeper to find it also triggers biochemical sensors that can send inflammation-reducing signals to muscle cells.

    In addition, massage signals muscle to build more mitochondria, the power centres of cells which play an important role in healing.

    "The main thing, and what is novel about our study, is that no one has ever looked inside the muscle to see what is happening with massage, no one looked at the biochemical effects or what might be going on in the muscle itself," said Crane.

    "We have shown the muscle senses that it is being stretched and this appears to reduce the cells' inflammatory response," he said. "As a consequence, massage may be beneficial for recovery from injury."

    Crane said the McMaster researchers are the first to take a manual therapy, like massage, and test the effect using a muscle biopsy to show massage reduces inflammation, an underlying factor in many chronic diseases.

    The research appears in the Feb. 1 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

    For their study, the researchers followed 11 men in their twenties.

    On their first visit, the men's exercise capacity was assessed. Two weeks later, the men cycled on a bicycle for more than 70 minutes, to a point of exhaustion when they couldn't cycle any more. They then rested for 10 minutes.

    While resting, a massage therapist lightly applied massage oil to both legs, and then performed massage for 10 minutes on one leg using a variety of techniques commonly used in rehabilitation.

    Muscle biopsies were done on both legs (quadriceps) and repeated 2.5 hours later. Researchers found reduced inflammation in the massaged leg.

    Crane admits being surprised that just 10 minutes of massage had such a profound effect. "I didn't think that little bit of massage could produce that remarkable of a change, especially since the exercise was so robust. Seventy minutes of exercise compared to 10 of massage, it is clearly potent." The results hint that massage therapy blunts muscle pain by the same biological mechanisms as most pain medications and could be an effective alternative.

    Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky, professor of medicine for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, oversaw the study.

    "Given that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with muscle atrophy and other processes such as insulin resistance, any therapy that can improve mitochondrial function may be beneficial," he said.

    Crane said this study is only a first step in determining the best therapies for promoting recovery from a variety of muscle injuries.

    He said that surprisingly the research proved one oft-repeated idea false: massage did not help clear lactic acid from tired muscles.


    SEE ARTICLE AT http://www.sciencedaily.com


    //02utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_health+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+News+--+Top+Health%29
  • 13 Jan 2012 10:03 AM | Greg Baker (Administrator)

    ScienceDaily (Feb. 9, 2010) undefined Doctors at Rush University Medical Center are offering pediatric patients diagnosed with chronic illnesses acupuncture therapy to help ease the pain and negative side effects like nausea, fatigue, and vomiting caused by chronic health conditions and intensive treatments. The confluence of Chinese and Western medicine at Rush Children's Hospital is part of a study to analyze and document how acupuncture might help in reducing pain in children and increase quality of life.

    "Treating children with acupuncture is a new frontier," said Dr. Paul Kent, pediatric hematology and oncology expert, Rush Children's Hospital. "We are looking to see if there is an effective pain management therapy we can offer that does not have the serious side effects that can be caused by narcotics and other serious pain medications."

    The lack of options for pain management in children has been reported as one of the most difficult aspects of providing care to pediatric patients. Research indicates that up to 70 percent of pediatric patients experience pain and those with chronic illnesses often do not have adequate relief or prevention of pain.

    "Acupuncture could be a potential solution to this dilemma of controlling pain in pediatric patients," said Angela Johnson, Chinese medicine practitioner at Rush.

    Acupuncture is the use of tiny, hair-thin needles which are gently inserted along various parts of the body. The therapy is based on the premise that patterns of energy flowing through the body are essential for health. This energy, called Qi, flows along certain pathways. It is believed that placing the tiny needles at points along the pathways reduce pain and improve the healing process.

    The National Institute of Health (NIH) has published a statement concluding that acupuncture is effective for treating adults for nausea following chemotherapy and for pain after dental surgery. The agency also said that the therapy might be useful in treating other health issues such as addiction, migraines, headaches, menstrual cramps, abdominal pain, tennis elbow, fibromyalgia, arthritis, low-back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome and asthma. In some pediatric studies, both patients and parents have stated that acupuncture treatments were both helpful and relaxing.

    Rush will be offering acupuncture therapy to pediatric patients between the ages of 5-20 years of age, who are experiencing pain. A practitioner who is licensed in acupuncture by the State of Illinois and certified by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine will be giving the treatments. Study participants will receive eight acupuncture treatments at no charge.

    "Many children with chronic or acute health issues turn to complementary or integrative approaches after all other conventional treatment options are exhausted," said Johnson. "Parents should be aware that integrative therapies like acupuncture can be helpful from the onset of disease and can have a tremendously positive influence on a child's quality of life."

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100209191441.htm


  • 13 Jan 2012 9:23 AM | Greg Baker (Administrator)

    The AcuTrials® Database is a comprehensive collection of randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupuncture published in the English language. The database is maintained by the Research Department at OCOM and is compiled primarily from PubMed, the Cochrane Library and the OCOM library. AcuTrials® is a unique resource for practitioners, students, and researchers interested in refining searches for specific acupuncture research.

    To learn more about AcuTrials® please go to acutrials.ocom.edu.


  • 12 Jan 2012 9:16 PM | Greg Baker (Administrator)
    ScienceDaily (Dec. 19, 2011) undefined Acupuncture significantly reduces levels of a protein in rats linked to chronic stress, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) have found. They say their animal study may help explain the sense of wellbeing that many people receive from this ancient Chinese therapy.

    Published online in December in Experimental Biology and Medicine, the researchers say that if their findings are replicated in human studies, acupuncture would offer a proven therapy for stress, which is often difficult to treat.

    "It has long been thought that acupuncture can reduce stress, but this is the first study to show molecular proof of this benefit," says the study's lead author, Ladan Eshkevari, Ph.D., an assistant professor at Georgetown's School of Nursing & Health Studies, a part of GUMC.

    Eshkevari, who is also a nurse anesthetist as well as a certified acupuncturist, says she conducted the study because many of the patients she treats with acupuncture in the pain clinic reported a "better overall sense of wellbeing -- and they often remarked that they felt less stress."

    While traditional Chinese acupuncture has been thought to relieve stress -- in fact, the World Health Organization states that acupuncture is useful as adjunct therapy in more than 50 disorders, including chronic stress -- Eshkevari says that no one has biological proof that it does so.

    So she designed a study to test the effect of acupuncture on blood levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide that is secreted by the sympathetic nervous system in rodents and humans. This system is involved in the "flight or fight" response to acute stress, resulting in constriction of blood flow to all parts of the body except to the heart, lungs, and brain (the organs most needed to react to danger). Chronic stress, however, can cause elevated blood pressure and cardiac disease.

    Eshkevari used rats in this study because these animals are often used to research the biological determinants of stress. They mount a stress response when exposed to winter-like cold temperatures for an hour a day.

    Eshkevari allowed the rats to become familiar with her, and encouraged them to rest by crawling into a small sock that exposed their legs. She very gently conditioned them to become comfortable with the kind of stimulation used in electroacupuncture -- an acupuncture needle that delivers a painless small electrical charge. This form of acupuncture is a little more intense than manual acupuncture and is often used for pain management, she says, adding "I used electroacupuncture because I could make sure that every rat was getting the same treatment dose."

    She then selected a single acupuncture spot to test: Zuslanli (ST 36 on the stomach meridian), which is said to help relieve a variety of conditions including stress. As with the rats, that acupuncture point for humans is on the leg below the knee.

    The study utilized four groups of rats for a 14-day experiment: a control group that was not stressed and received no acupuncture; a group that was stressed for an hour a day and did not receive acupuncture; a group that was stressed and received "sham" acupuncture near the tail; and the experimental group that were stressed and received acupuncture to the Zuslanli spot on the leg.

    She found NPY levels in the experimental group came down almost to the level of the control group, while the rats that were stressed and not treated with Zuslanli acupuncture had high levels of the protein.

    In a second experiment, Eshkevari stopped acupuncture in the experimental group but continued to stress the rats for an additional four days, and found NPY levels remained low. "We were surprised to find what looks to be a protective effect against stress," she says.

    Eshkevari is continuing to study the effect of acupuncture with her rat models by testing another critical stress pathway. Preliminary results look promising, she says.

    The study was funded by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists doctoral fellowship award to Eshkevari, and by a grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Co-authors include Georgetown researchers Susan Mulroney, Ph.D., Rupert Egan, Dylan Phillips, Jason Tilan, Elissa Carney, Nabil Azzam, Ph.D., and Hakima Amri, Ph.D.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111219150915.htm


 

   

   Administration Office Hours Hilo Campus
   Tues, Wed, Thur  - 9am to 4pm

   Business & Financial Aid Office Hours
   Tues, Wed, Thurs - 10am to 4pm

   Hilo Clinic Hours
   Open: Mon & Fri - 9.30 am to 12.30pm, 2.30pm to 6.30pm.

   Phone Numbers

   Admissions:        (808)981-2790    Fax: (866) 757-2131   

   Administration:   (808)981-2790    Fax: (866) 757-2131

   Hilo Clinic:          (808)933-1369    Fax: (866) 757-2131
                         
                     

College Addresses:            

MAILING ADDRESS
Hawaii College of Oriental Medicine
180 Kinoole Street, Suite 301
Hilo, HI 96720







Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software